thinslis

My DIY Rack

38 posts in this topic

This is my DIY rack. From bottom to top: Panamax Power conditioner, DirecTV DVR x2, HC300C, 4 zone AMP. Network shelf: D-Link 24 port Gig switch, Linksys Router, ZOOM cable modem, POE Injector for Netgear WAP, 48 port Black Box Patch pannel.

Rack2.jpg

Rack3.jpg

Rack4.jpg

Rack1.jpg

Edited by thinslis

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Thanks, I want to clean it up a little bit more but for now we're still busy unpacking and organizing.

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I actually like that set-up. Lots of room, cables come straight-off and are supported, easy to trace wiring. Good work there!

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Thanks. I'm thinking down the road my dealer is going to have to consolidate equipment to accomodate future growth. I'm thinking the two DVRs could be stacked on one shelf ect. My future equipment list includes: Video matrix switch, Home Theater reciever, Some type of Blue Ray player or Media server. We'll just see where we get with what I've got so far =)

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Yeah, that was the only thing I was thinking is what to do when more equipment comes along. You could probably compress the shelves to make room for a few more. How about cooling? I assume that staircase will be enclosed at some point in the future??

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You might consider shelf rails with adjustable brackets. Most home improvement stores sell them. These are the wall brackets that have slots in them that you slide the shelf brackets into. I have these in my own EQ room.

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@Controlfouruserguy - Yes we have plans to finish off the basement in the future. At that point the stairs will be drywalled and a door installed. At that time I'll be looking at installing vents top and bottom and probably some fans to draw in cool air from the floor vent.

@Henniae - Do you bolt the shelf to bracket on those? I thought the shelves just set on top of the brackets?

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@Henniae - Do you bolt the shelf to bracket on those? I thought the shelves just set on top of the brackets?

The shelf rails and brackets that I used allow you to screw the shelf board to the bracket.

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REALLY NICE for DIY!!!!! Good Job! It is so refreshing see someone doing DIY the right way and only cutting the corners that have nothing to do with stability or performance!

Great Job!

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@henniae - I'll have to look at that for the next phase. I don't want to do a rip and replace without a current need.

@jwhitaker@revit - I wanted to go with a 72u Rack I really did, but it just wasn't in my budget. Once the basement is finished no one is going to see any of this anyways...

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^Actually, after people who tour my house relieve themselves of the ususaul obligatory compliments, I take them down to see the equipment room and the racks. That is generally when people begin to "relieve" themselves in the true sense.

Sometimes a picture is worth more than verbal description :) Show us your rack!

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I've been threatening to post pictures of my DIY rack, but I don't think I can now. I have my cables buttoned up fairly well, but not as well as thinslis.

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lol, being a self professed rack master... you should see my rack! Not the best at all. but i am cleaning it up and streamlining it. Decided i had "too many" sources. I may put some pics up when i am done. But I guess you couldn't consider my rack a DIY?

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Thinslis,

Honest question.

Are you worried that the shelves may fall off?

Never seen a shelve just fall off, (maybe in earthquake country)

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@dogdvr - Not a chance. I actually goofed and forgot to predrill the holes in the shelves before I mounted them. Most of the holes were fine but a few of them I really needed to lay into the drill to get it to finish. Must have been the hot drill bit and MDF board or something but it didn't want to cut anymore. Now I go 230lbs and I was putting all my weight into the drill and finally the one hole ripped through... the bracket was just barely bent out of level. So I would say no, there is no way those shelves are going to "fall off". Each board has 3 screws into each bracket and each bracket has 3 into the studs.

I wouldn't even hesitate to put a full UPS on one of them.

@IloveC4 - I can't take credit for the actual running of the cables, my dealer did that, however I did run all the lines that go to the patch pannel and I told the dealer how I wanted all his cables to run. So my design, he did the labor. (Notice how the lines come down from over your head and hug the bottom of the stairs then cross over at the landing, that was done to preserve excess cable in case I do buy a real 72u Rack some day)

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Nice job overall.

One thing I would have recommended you had done is to cover the wall with 3/4 inch plywood (not MDF). This would give you a place to screw miscellaneous stuff to the wall. I use plywood because MDF is a bit too fragile when you use small screws.

Also leave a large service loop of cable. It looks like you did this.

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@henniae - Thank you, I lost a lot of sleep trying to come up with the best design with a limited budget (for the rack).

As for covering the wall with 3/4 plywood I don't see the need to do thise. Right now I can nail 2x10 between the studs on a as needed basis (left over scraps from constructions so zero cost). Leaving the stud cavity's open gives me the ability to run power lines down through the back of the shelf rather then down the same holes with the AV / Network cables. Plus it will be easier to work with when I go to run power for the outlets / lights when I start finishing the basment.

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I see that all your CAT6 runs into your patch panel, but only one cable links into your switch. Have you not patched your other cables into the switch yet?

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@getafix - Correct, our office desk was damaged when they delivered it so right now the only thing patched in is my temporary jack for my PC. Also I only intend to patch in jacks that are going to be used. So mostly Office, Living room, Master bedroom. The rest are for future use... IE: if we allow the kids to have computers in their rooms (Not likely though =) ).

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The one thing I would suggest is to properly sheetrock around the stairs before you put anything serious under there.

In our jurisdiction, it's required for firestopping. 5/8" sheetrock, I believe. Putting equipment under the stairs without some sheetrock isn't a great idea, imho.

RyanE

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The one thing I would suggest is to properly sheetrock around the stairs before you put anything serious under there.

In our jurisdiction, it's required for firestopping. 5/8" sheetrock, I believe. Putting equipment under the stairs without some sheetrock isn't a great idea, imho.

RyanE

I'll look into it. But I don't see how this is any different from having a work shop in an unfinished basement, you still have equipment plugged into wall outlets and uncovered studs...

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It is the protection for the staircase that is RyanE is referring to (we live in the same town ;) ). It is to protect the stairs from fire, so you can get out of the basement.

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He's in so he's got a C of O already. He can do what he wants. Any piece in his rack is suspect if a short occurs. For that matter the toaster in my kitchen has potential too.

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I know, I'm just saying that for Fire Protection here, in Utah, they make you cover up the underside of the stairs.

Obviously he has his occupancy permit, and obviously it isn't required there. Still a good idea IMO. Stairs are obviously a critical part of exit strategy in a multilevel home.

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