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Araknis Router (AN-310-RT-4L2W) - not all devices shown in Client Table


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Regarding my Araknis Router (AN-310-RT-4L2W): this is a minor issue, but one which has perplexed me. I know some here don't care for Araknis, but it's what my company uses, and it has generally performed well for me. It is configured as the DHCP Server for my network, is the only Router present, everything is pretty straightforward.

Anyway, I've noticed that occasionally a given device doesn't show up in the Client Table of IP addresses, even though they have acquired an IP address in the usual assignable range. The most recent example: I bought a BossTrend WiFi to Ethernet Adapter, to see if or how it would work connecting my JVC NX7 Projector to the network. Mine is now controlled with the IR Driver, which works fine. But I'm also troubleshooting some things with madVR Labs, which makes the Envy video processor, and IP control may come in handy. Not all Envy customers have their projectors connected with ethernet, and in many cases, including mine, running another cable to it would be difficult.

So the idea was to be able to send the projector IP commands, and so I was testing this out with Control4, with the JVC IP Driver. It actually works fine, which is the main thing I was testing for.

But for some reason, this Adapter's IP address doesn't show in the Client Table. I normally use IP Reservation in that table to prevent changes, and since it doesn't show up there, that option isn't available. I can then manually add it, using its MAC Address and the current IP Address, in the Settings section, but this doesn't "stick." If I unplug the device, when it powers back up, it acquires a different IP address. To access its user interface, I then have to find its IP address using Fing or other tool, and I can then get in.

Networking is definitely a weak area for me, but I would like to understand what's going on here, and what, if anything, can be done to address it. There is nothing in this device's UI where I can assign an IP, or basically any other IP related settings. It connects to my Araknis WiFi access point, just like my phones or any other WiFi device, so it isn't clear to me why it doesn't show up like the others.

Thanks.

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49 minutes ago, chopedogg88 said:

usually that happens when the device has an IP statically assigned on the device itself.

I appreciate the reply and thought. In that situation, would the device assign itself a different IP after a power cycle? That's what seems to be happening.

Also, when I run Fing, it shows the device's IP address just fine, which seems weird considering the Araknis router itself doesn't list it.

What may make this whole thing not work is if the JVC's IP address also changes with a power cycle. That would make it problematic for the Envy to communicate with it.

Thanks.

Also: I've written to the makers of the device, but so far just getting the basic 'canned' answers which don't actually address my problem. But I'll keep after them.

 

And if this proves to be unreliable because of IP address changes that can't be eliminated, is anyone aware of a reliable similar device that would allow an ethernet connection to the JVC via WiFi?

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10 minutes ago, chopedogg88 said:

the device's IP shouldn't be changing if its set to static on the device itself.  this is a JVC projector you're talking about?  If so just check the network settings for it on the on-screen menu.

The BossTrend device doesn't seem to have the ability to set itself a static IP as far as I can see. I had configured it initially, plugged into a wall socket, and it acquired an IP within the Router's range. I manually created an IP Reservation in the Router for that IP. But when I unplugged it, and moved it to its final location, up near the projector, the next day, it no longer had that same IP.

I run a short ethernet cable from the BossTrend device to my JVC, where as you say, there are network settings. I set it to DHCP to acquire an IP from the Router, and it connected fine. But the next day, after both devices had been unplugged from the wall socket, both of their IP's had changed, and I lost network connection to the JVC.

This does work fine if I can just figure out a way to prevent the IP's from changing after a power cycle.

And interestingly, even when it did connect, the JVC also did not show up in the Router's Client Table, while it did in Fing. Somehow this fact may be the key to understanding what's going on, and therefore potentially how to fix it. What would account for Fing showing these devices while the Router doesn't?

 

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17 hours ago, Don Cohen said:

a given device doesn't show up in the Client Table of IP addresses, even though they have acquired an IP address in the usual assignable range

Depending on it's broadcasting method, this is not all that strange - it happens to all routers.

4 hours ago, Don Cohen said:

I manually created an IP Reservation in the Router for that IP. But when I unplugged it, and moved it to its final location, up near the projector, the next day, it no longer had that same IP.

Two options: you mis typed the MAC address (broadcast name is irrelevant) OR (and this can aggravate the not showing up as well) the devices uses random mac address technology (commonly found on phones) where it spoofs random mac addresses on every reconnect

 

5 hours ago, Don Cohen said:

if the JVC's IP address also changes with a power cycle.

Pretty sure all JVCs can set a static if push comes to shove...

 

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, Cyknight said:

Depending on it's broadcasting method, this is not all that strange - it happens to all routers.

Two options: you mis typed the MAC address (broadcast name is irrelevant) OR (and this can aggravate the not showing up as well) the devices uses random mac address technology (commonly found on phones) where it spoofs random mac addresses on every reconnect

Pretty sure all JVCs can set a static if push comes to shove...

Many thanks for the reply.

I had wondered if I had mis-typed the MAC address - I'll re-try this, and monitor it to see if it changes. But actually now that I think of it, after a power cycle yesterday, Fing showed it having 2 IP addresses, which seemed strange. I then remembered I had the original MAC address in an IP reservation in my router. Once I removed that, it only showed the 1 (new) IP address, I was able to get a fresh DHCP assigned IP for the JVC, and was able to connect. That would seem to prove that I hadn't mis-typed it.

And yes, the JVC can be set to a static IP in its network interface. I had tried that yesterday and it wouldn't connect. But that was before I discovered the above issue with the BrosTrend device. But you may be right - if I set the currently assigned IP to static with everything working, then hopefully it will 'survive' a power cycle on the BrosTrend device, even if this device itself emerges with a different IP.

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Well, it's going back to Amazon. I found that after a power loss, it came back with a slightly different MAC address, as was suggested above. And one time it came back with an unreachable IP address. Great concept, but the execution is lacking.

I looked at the reviews of a similar device made by Iogear, and one guy said he spoke with their engineers and determined that it would work well with a typical 'home' Router, which handles both DHCP and WiFi. But if one is using a dedicated Router, with separate Access Points for the WiFi, as I am, problems will follow.

If anyone is aware of a more 'robust' device that would allow a stable ethernet connection by WiFi, please let me know.

Thanks for the help here.

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4 hours ago, Cyknight said:

Have you tried network over power? It's hit and miss (depends on electrical phase) but if it works, it's usually fairly stable.

 

I have used this on occasion, but mainly in the context of needing WiFi. For example, I have a Moen Flo valve under my house, which needs WiFi rather than Ethernet, and used a Netgear Powerlink there. And you're right on both counts - they are 'picky' in terms of where they'll work, depending on the electrical layout of the house, but it has been quite stable. So this would potentially be an option. But I'd rather have a more 'universal' solution to recommend to others for use in this context.

I found another device that seems more robust, the Silex BR-500AC Ethernet to WiFi Bridge. It's around $190, and seems more business oriented. I contacted their support describing the failings of the BrosTrend device, and they replied fairly quickly, indicating that this should behave as a 'normal' device in terms of MAC address, stable IP, etc. In fact, there are 2 modes, single or multi client, and in single mode, it uses the MAC address of the Ethernet connected device, which seems ideal, and nothing should change with a power cycle.

It is a bit more money, but could be cheaper and 'cleaner' in a retro-fit situation to get a stable ethernet connection to the projector.

Thanks for the suggestion.

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20 minutes ago, RAV said:

Didn't read it all, assume you need to supply a network connection to something that isn't WiFi?

Get a TPlink Travel router, set it up as WiFi to LAN.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00TQEX8BO/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Thanks. I'll look into it. I do like TP-Link in general, but after the BrosTrend experience, I wonder if consumer level devices like this are sufficiently robust and reliable, have similar IP or MAC address issues, etc. Cheap enough to try anyway.

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43 minutes ago, Don Cohen said:

Thanks. I'll look into it. I do like TP-Link in general, but after the BrosTrend experience, I wonder if consumer level devices like this are sufficiently robust and reliable, have similar IP or MAC address issues, etc. Cheap enough to try anyway.

I've used the TPlink piece a couple of times for similar use, and it's been fine. I've even setup a couple as Internet less routers for little Control4 systems. (ie a simple lighting system)
I'd recommend a 2.4 only SSID, and attach it to that.

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1 hour ago, Don Cohen said:

Not exactly sure what you're suggesting here - can you elaborate?

Thanks!

I don't know how your wifi is setup. Many just setup a single SSID as either dual band (5 and 2.4) or single band 5.
We add a dedicated 2.4 only SSID, and stick all the stupid, poor, unknown quality internet of things devices on it.
That keeps them off the 5 band, many of their radios are garbage, many get confused by dual band, so we isolate them.
And if one of them gets hacked, goes rogue, we have a questionable wifi strength or something, I can turn their SSID off real easy and block them all in one stroke.

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5 hours ago, Don Cohen said:

It is a bit more money, but could be cheaper and 'cleaner' in a retro-fit situation to get a stable ethernet connection to the projector.

I suspect you're on the right path there.

16 minutes ago, RAV said:

We add a dedicated 2.4 only SSID

Always a good idea too

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